Financial Security Resources Definitions

  • A

    anti-money laundering software (AML)

    Anti-laundering software is a type of computer program used by financial institutions to analyze customer data and detect suspicious transactions... (Continued)

  • B

    Bank Secrecy Act (BSA)

    The Bank Secrecy Act (BSA), also known as the Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act, is legislation passed by the United States Congress in 1970 that requires U.S. financial institutions to collaborate with the U.S. government in cases of suspected money laundering and fraud.

  • Big 4 (Final 4)

    The Big 4, also known as the Final 4, are the four largest international accounting and professional services firms.

  • C

    card verification value (CVV)

    Card verification value (CVV) is a combination of features used in credit, debit and automated teller machine (ATM) cards for the purpose of establishing the owner's identity and minimizing the risk of fraud... (Continued)

  • CISP-PCI (Cardholder Information Security Program - Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

    CISP (Cardholder Information Security Program) and PCI (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard) are specifications developed and used by credit card companies for the purpose of ensuring and enhancing the privacy and security of financial data... (Continued)

  • Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)

    Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) provides unique identifiers for publicly known security threats.

  • corporate governance

    Corporate governance is a term that refers broadly to the rules, processes, or laws by which businesses are operated, regulated, and controlled...

  • CTCI (Computer-to-computer interface)

    Computer-to-computer interface (CTCI) is a digital communications protocol that allows customers of the NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) to conduct business in the options market... (Continued)

  • D

    DROP (delivery of real-time execution information protocol)

    DROP (delivery of real-time execution information protocol) is a feature of various NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) protocols that allows a subscriber to continuously view vital information about trades including the date and time, the participants (by symbol or icon), order identification data, condensed descriptions, the exchange prices and relevant commissions... (Continued)

  • E

    eavesdropping

    Eavesdropping is the unauthorized real-time interception of a private communication, such as a phone call, instant message, videoconference or fax transmission.

  • electronic discovery (e-discovery or ediscovery)

    Electronic discovery (also called e-discovery or ediscovery) refers to any process in which electronic data is sought, located, secured, and searched with the intent of using it as evidence in a civil or criminal legal case.

  • F

    FACTA (Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act)

    FACTA (Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act) is an amendment to FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act ) that was added, primarily, to protect consumers from identity theft... (Continued)

  • FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act)

    FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) is a United States Law that regulates how consumer credit information is collected, used and shared... (Continued)

  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is an independent agency of the United States (U.S.) federal government that preserves public confidence in the banking system by insuring deposits... (Continued)

  • Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP)

    The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) are rules that specify procedures for civil legal suits within United States federal courts... (Continued)

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