Cooperating with law enforcement for U.S. security

We need to collaborate on suspected information. ISPs have a responsibility to the users, as such, they should cooperate with law enforcement to continue to monitor the security of U.S. perimeters.

Below you will find SearchSecurity.com expert Sondra Schneider's response to questions about how the PATRIOT Act affects individual security and civil liberties. This article is one of a group of SearchSecurity.com expert answers to questions on this legislation.

Every company has a basic premise -- protect the family jewels from theft, modification or destruction. The homeowner decides how to protect the family jewels, with security alarm systems, safes dogs, etc. He decides who should enter the domain by providing a key or permission. Networks are similar in that we have now have a DMZ in front of networks that hold personal information just like an external mail box. Everyday personal and corporate information is at risk. If someone wanted your personal information they'd find a way to open your mail and extract or copy what they needed. On our networks it is easier than ever to take personal or corporate information. The public is less concerned with:

  • How ISPs protect their information, or else we would have better security.
  • There is a lack of understanding that software Trojans can easily steal your information, or the ISP would provide anti-Trojan software.
  • People with intent to steal our personal information will do so, because there are significant vulnerabilities in every network.
  • For those reasons we need to collaborate on suspected information. ISPs have a responsibility to the users, as such, they should cooperate with law enforcement to continue to monitor the security of U.S. perimeters.


    Read the other SearchSecurity.com expert responses:
  • Ed Tittel: Contemplating the PATRIOT Act
  • Kevin Beaver: The USA PATRIOT Act: Increasing the size of government
  • Jon Callas: Invasion of the PATRIOT Act
  • Ed Yakabovicz: When there's too much security
  • Stephen Mencik: The Patriot Act and Carnivore: Reasons for concern?
  • Dig deeper on Bank Secrecy Act compliance and anti-money laundering training

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